Redis

Feb. 28, 2017, 5:05 p.m.

I've been messing around with Redis for a little while now and I'm using it in a couple places on this site. The first thing I did was I started caching some DB queries that get performed a lot, like the main blog page, the blog archives menu and the list of recent posts on the home page. Laravel's Cache facade makes caching really easy, and you can switch between the default cache driver which caches to files and Redis without changing any of the code. For some pages I use the Laravel Cache facade, for others I use the Redis facade to cache directly to Redis just for some variety. In general it is probably much better to use the Cache facade than the Redis facade because if you want to switch to a different caching mechanism with one change to the .env file instead of having to rewrite all of the code.

I also use Redis to queue some tasks which don't need to be done synchronously, but that's another post.

I never used Memcache because I didn't like the fact that it's all stored in memory, so if the server goes down you would lose all of the data in it, but Redis persists data to disk by default so it provides the speed of keeping data in memory with a very low risk of losing the data. In my case, I store the data in the DB and cache it in Redis, but if I were to start from scratch (and had plenty of RAM on my server) I would probably keep a lot more data in Redis.

So, to summarize, I think Redis is awesome and I will definitely make more use of it in my stack in the future.

Labels: coding

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Database Change to My Record Collection

Feb. 28, 2017, 5:04 p.m.

In my records table I used to have the full text of the label in each row, but I ended up with small typos in label names that ended up screwing things up. So I separated the labels out into their own table and added a foreign key to link the two tables. In my records admin instead of having a text field for the label I used a drop-down that was populated from the labels table. But this caused more problems than it solved, because it greatly complicated the code for searching records, updating records, and I had to write extra methods to add new labels to the labels table.

So I decided to get rid of the extra table and just put the full text back into the records table. I kept the drop-down menu in the admin section, but populated it with data pulled from the records table to eliminate my original problem. To my Record model I added a public static function that selects the distinct labels with the text as the key and the value to pass to the drop-down menu, and then was able to greatly simplify a lot of my code. 

I just pushed this up a few minutes ago, and so far haven't found any problems, but that doesn't mean they aren't there. If anyone finds any errors in the Record Collection page or the API please let me know.

As a side note, having PHPUnit tests for everything already set up made this a whole lot easier. I didn't have to go through and check every possible combination of things that could be searched or test adding and editing and all of that because I already had the tests written. I used to rely on a QA department to regression test everything, but PHPUnit makes all of that much easier and instead of waiting days to have QA people check everything I can do it in under a minute myself.

Labels: coding , music

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SSL and Let's Encrypt

Feb. 28, 2017, 5:03 p.m.

The first time I ever tried to install an SSL certificate on a web server was probably around 1999. At the time there were only a couple options - Verisign and Thawte if I remember correctly, the certificates cost a couple hundred dollars each, and you had to go through a lengthy and complicated process to get the certificate approved which involved compiling a lot of documentation (I remember being asked for a Dun & Bradstreet number for one thing), multiple phone calls, and took a couple weeks to complete. Once the certificate was finally approved and issued the process of trying to install it on the server was almost as complicated.

How times have changed. Yesterday I installed a certificate on this server. It was free and took about 15 minutes, most of which was spent trying to find the documentation. At first I was just messing around and decided to install a self-signed certificate, which was quick and easy, but having to click through the page which says that "this site is insecure" was nerve wracking, even knowing that it doesn't really mean anything. A quick Google search turned up lets encrypt which offers free SSL certificates that are recognized by most browsers.

As easy as installing an SSL certificate for Apache is, I then found CertBot which makes it even easier. The main page has instructions for different OSes and servers. For Ubuntu I just installed the certbot package and ran it, it asked me what domains I wanted the certificate to cover and for my email address and then generated it.

I was a bit wary of allowing CertBot to change my Apache config so I just had it generate the certificates and did the config myself. After I had no problems, on my other server I let CertBot do the config as well and had no problems at all. And when it was done SSL just worked, I didn't have to touch the config or even restart Apache, much less provide a DUNS number. I'd like to thank the EFF and Lets Encrypt for CertBot and for making this so easy.

Labels: coding

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Using Laravel Packages

Feb. 28, 2017, 5:02 p.m.

Since I have multiple sites that use almost the same code I have been trying to consolidate shared code into Laravel packages for ease of maintenance. This weekend I did my second package which is escuccim/sitemap which contains my code for generating XML sitemaps for Google. Since I have this site available in more than one language and I use subdomains to set the default language it made for very messy and confusing hardcoded sitemaps. I was able to shrink the code for each sitemap down from hundreds of lines to about 50 by putting the subdomains and the corresponding language in a DB table and then looping through them to output the URLs and hreflang tags in the sitemap. This time the process of writing the package was quick and easy using the same method that I struggled with last time.

Once I had that working I went back to my LaraBlog package which I added translation functionality to. I had one big problem which took me a while to figure out which was that it wasn't loading the translations at all, it was just displaying the key: 'escuccim::blog.key'. I researched this and found no answers, but was able to solve it by changing the namespace or hint to larablog. I am not sure why this worked, but I suspect it may be because I was using the namespace escuccim for the views and maybe they conflicted? Anyway if anyone else is having this issue try to change the namespace/hint.

When I had the blog package translating properly I deleted the code I was using for this site for the blog and the sitemap and replaced it with the new packages. So far everything seems fine, but I will give it a day or two before to turn up any issues before I start using the packages in other places. 

I have a few other things I want to put into packages, and I just have to say that Composer makes my life so much easier! Instead of having to go through my code line by line to copy changes from one place to another while avoiding any functionality that differs from one project to the next I just update the package and then composer does the rest!

Labels: coding , laravel

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